Bio-IT World Conference 2018 – Data Science Has Replaced Bioinformatics

This year’s conference kicked off with an interesting Data Science panel that included Tanya Cashorali (TCB Analytics), Jerald Schindler (Alkermes), John Reynders (Alexion Pharmaceuticals), and Lihua Yu (H3 Biomedicine). Without a doubt, data science is important and involves much more than big data, including the entire workflow of data creation, to insight generation, and decision-making. One key message that came across is that not all data is big data, and that we need improvements in data collection and infrastructure support for data analysis and management. Other key take-home messages: breaking down data silos, educating about responsibility, being responsible to not act independently on data, creating an environment that motivates everybody within a team to share, not rewarding bad data behavior, and being insensitive to data sharing to get more out in return. The big issue here is the culture. If the culture rewards Continue reading

Diploid Tackles the Challenges of Rare Disease Diagnostics

enlightenbio is excited to introduce our new “Company Spotlight” blog series where we will review some of the exciting work that is currently ongoing in up- and-coming companies. Moving forward we plan on reviewing and profiling some of these companies and their products on a regular basis.

At ASHG, I had a chance to meet with Peter Schols, CEO of Diploid, a small seven person company located in Leuven, Belgium. I took this opportunity to learn more about Diploid, and Moon, the software the company has built, and its intended application to help diagnose rare disease.

The following summarizes questions and answers from my dialogue with Peter Schols.

EB: Tell us more about Diploid – what need are you trying to address and what services do you offer?

PS: Diploid is a privately funded, rare disease diagnostics company founded in 2014. Diploid started with offering an interpretation service, helping our customers analyze rare disease sequence data. Customers send us NGS data of a patient together with a description of the phenotype, and we deliver a report listing the most likely candidate variants. We focus exclusively on rare disease testing and currently support the Continue reading

At ASHG 2014 genomics was everywhere, with big data and variant analysis/interpretation

AHSG Last week the annual gathering of human geneticists happened at the convention center in sunny San Diego. This year this engaging conference was dominated by genomics, and in particular the topics of big data, variant analysis and interpretation. This emphasis was clearly reflected in the scientific talks, but also in the commercial sector with many companies focusing on providing new solutions on variant analysis, reaching even into the clinical space.

Besides the scientific and commercial aspect of ASHG, which I will summarize later in this blog post, this year the conferences had a strong human side associated with it. For the first time two movies were presented – Genetics in Motion Movies – that were engaging and spot on considering recent news and announcements about the benefits and/or conflicts of knowing and understanding genetic diseases. The first movie [Twitch with Kristen Powers] explored the impact of genetic testing on a young person whose mother had Huntington’s disease. While the movie follows Kristen Powers as she undergoes testing for the disease, it also examines the basic science of the disease itself. The second movie [On Beauty with Rick Guidotti] nicely addresses the need of first recognizing the person before the disease. Rick Guidotti achieves this phenomenally by capturing the beauty of an individual person and not focusing primarily on the disease – his pictures are indeed amazing. Of special interest in this context is

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